Capsule Reviews by Mark E. Waterbury

Antry – Devil Don’t Care
Tres Lobas Enterprises – TLE-CD-8849
Even Christian/Praise music is not immune to having too many artists/songs sound the same. Tulsa’s Antry uses both his faith and musical talents to create something a bit more intriguing musically while still carrying his heartfelt messages. Melding various stylings of blues, country and pop, the music ranges from lush and charismatic to potent and gripping. In any case, this is a very powerful way to spread The Word and the uniqueness and musical talent involved with its creation only enhances the chance of it making a difference in people’s lives.
Antry
Ben Bostick – Hellfire
Simply Fantastic Music
Country artist Ben Bostick loves his roots and he scorches them like a prairie wildfire. From old school honky tonk to Memphis blues-fueled rockers, Ben tears up any preconceived notions about roots country since he is unafraid to kick in some unconventional stylings that lend a subtle punk feeling while keeping strong hooks intact. The vocal work is a robust cross between Jerry Lee Lewis and Waylon Jennings prone to some interesting phrasing calisthenics, further augmenting the often darkly humorous lyrics. The CD is loaded with excellent musicianship fueled by brash power. Ben doesn’t just turn Nashville on its ear with his music, but he boots it down the road with a steel toe and screams “make room for me!” And they had better because this is seriously fresh music.
BenBostick
Tim Woods – Human Race
To set yourself apart playing blues these days, no need to be strong in your roots but have a bit of something extra. Macon (by way of western Pennsylvania guitarist/vocalist) Tim Woods has that something extra, and it is this undeniable raw feel that ratchets up the intensity of his music. Even the ballads feel potent and some of the rockers are over the top with blistering guitar work and bone-breaking rhythms. Balancing this is his surprisingly melodic voice which still has just the right touch of grit. You can almost smell the tubes in the amps overheating on this one and feel the studio walls shake.
TimWoods

 

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Capsule Reviews by Mark E. Waterbury

Laura Benitez and The Heartache – With All Its Thorns
While many guys in country are going back to their roots, some of the gals are as well. The third release by Laura Benitez and her band The Heartache exemplifies this as she channels influences of some of the great ladies of country into her own sound. Her voice is undeniably catchy, with a sweetly subtly operatic croon that drives home the from-the-heart lyrics she writes. Musically you are transported back several decades, either clapping along at some smoky Texas honky-tonk, or tapping your toes and smiling in a chair at the Ryman. Both retro and refreshing, this is someone to watch out for.
LauraBenitez
Rich Krueger – Life Ain’t That Long
Rockink Music – RKM002
Long time member of the band The Dysfunctionells, Rich Krueger has released another excellent solo CD featuring his sharp lyrical wit melded with varied musical sensibilities. With a subtly powerful vote that feels a cross between Van Morrison and Cat Stevens, Rich takes you on a story telling journey that feels just like that…like he is sitting at some campfire sharing a half pint with you and regaling you with life stories and perspectives. Enhancing the stories further with unique music backdrops reaching many roots of folk, rock, country and blues, this is one tasty stew for even the most finicky of songwriting aficionados.
RichKrueger

 

Gerry Spehar – Anger Management

Gerry Spehar – Anger Management
In his 1997 song “Christmas in Washington,” troubadour Steve Earle implored “Comeback Woody Guthrie.” Gerry Spehar may have produced that comeback in spirit with his latest release. The Colorado singer/songwriter pulls no punches with his current political statements on this CD, leaning a bit more on the country side of folk than Woody but still infusing a bare–bone hominess that catches the ear and exemplifies the words. The sardonically humorous “Thank You Donald” kicks off the festivities with a bluegrass lilt. The moody, somber folk of “A Soldier’s Spiritual” is a soul-stirring plea about veteran’s difficulties. “Carnival” is like a twisted tent revival preaching a unique perspective on the legacy of LBJ. Gerry tackles multiple timely issues including racism, war, and immigration with music ranging from bizarrely delectable to musically potent. There are many talented players involved with this CD, but Gerry’s voice showcasing a wonderful diversity in both tonal qualities and emotive output is the real star here. He definitely has a lot to say and whether you believe or agree with him or not, the way he conveys his opinions and messages will no doubt get you to at least listen, and maybe think a bit as well.  – MW
GerrySpehar

 

Dukes of the Orient – Dukes of the Orient

Dukes of the Orient – Dukes of the Orient
Frontiers Records – FR CD 845
Bassist/vocalist extraordinaire John Payne and keyboard maestro Erik Norlander have once again joined forces, and the result is mesmerizing. A few years removed from the Asia featuring John Payne era, John and Erik have unleashed both their musical and songwriting talents creating a CD that wonderfully melds the intricacies of prog with the pop sensibilities that Asia was known for during the Payne era. This is obvious straight out of the gate as the rollicking “Brothers In Arms” appears both radio ready with enough musical prowess to please the most ardent prog rock fans. While vestiges of Asia are obvious, the envelope is stretched further – very evident in the driving power of “ A Sorrows’s Crown” and the ear-opening opus “Give Another Reason.”  Songs like “Time Waits For No One” and “Seasons Will Change” are strong with their comforting hooks; the musicianship being tempered a bit, but still amazing in a subtle way. It does feel even more like a reunion when you see the guest musicians include guitarists who were members of the John-Payne-era Asia (Jeff Kollman, Moni Scaria, Bruce Bouillet, and Guthrie Govan) along with Asia featuring John Payne drummer Jay Schellen. This is mostly John’s and Erik’s work, combining influences of their past collaborations with other facets of their songwriting souls to create some brilliant music. – MW
DukesOfTheOrient

 

Capsule Reviews by Mark Waterbury

Teresa James & The Rhythm Tramps – Here In Babylon
Jesi-Lu Records
L.A.’s veteran songstress Teresa James has strong roots growing into several branches of blues. The result is a sultry, sometimes bawdy but undoubtably catchy group of songs that smacks of barrel houses where you have to squint through the smoke to glimpse the band. Her delectable twinkling of the 88 keys is backed by a robust crew of talented players, kicking life into songs whether mellow or rocking. Teresa’s powerful voice from the Bonnie Raitt school rips loose the songs in potently soulful fashion. Some highly enjoyable tunes here.
TeresaJames
Tim Woods – Human Race
The lead track of Pittsburgh singer/songwriter/guitarist Tim Wood’s second CD is called “Can You Feel It?” and, believe me, you can. You can feel old wooden floors shaking, tube amps vibrating, bandaids hastily wrapped around bleeding fingers. Yeah ,you can call it blues, you can call it rock, but Tim puts a unique enough spin on the songs that you can’t really pigeon hole it. His voice is pleasantly haunted by the ghost of Jim Morrison, his guitar work is often stunning, and the music gives the impression of a headlong free for all that works just right. A great example of someone who lets it all loose when he writes and plays music.
TimWoods

 

Andrew Sheppard – Steady Your Aim

Andrew Sheppard – Steady Your Aim
The outlaw country revival drives on and Idaho singer-songwriter Andrew Sheppard is one of the newer voices taking the wheel. His sophomore effort is brimming with thought-provoking lyrics along with musical landscapes featuring vistas of old school country, blues and alt edginess, highlighted by Andrew’s Willie-meets-Dylan vocal prowess. From the traditional folk feeling “Take A Walk With Me” to the gritty blues-tinged roots of “Lies As Cheap As Whiskey”, and the rollicking groove of “Here At The Bottom”, Andrew proves highly adept at creating tuneful mosaics that burrow deep into your soul with the honesty of the rods while delighting your musical appreciation receptors with the vibrancy of the song structures. This is another one of the many breaths of fresh air into today’s country scene – an ear opening effort that could lead to bigger things for this talented artist and storyteller.   – MW
AndrewSheppard

 

Capsule Review by Mark E. Waterbury

Kings & Associates – Tales of a Rich Girl
There are artists in other countries that understand American blues. Australia’s Kings & Associates not only understand it; they live, breathe, and play it very well. They take some unique twists and turns into R&B and very rootsy retro feelings, and have both a male and female vocalist who seethe pure emotion whether crooning the ballads or letting loose with the more rocking tracks. We know folks down under can rock. They can really rock the blues as well if this band is any indication.
Kings&Assoc

 

Capsule Reviews by Mark Waterbury

Tim Bennett – The View From Here
Sandy Beach Records
With Chris Stapleton leading the blues-influenced country rebirth, there are also those who are going retro in the honky-tonk direction. Tim Bennett’s second CD proves that he is giving serious credence to that direction with a great collection of toe-tappers and heart-breakers. With a subtly robust vocal croon, Tim’s surprisingly topical lyrics are fueled by buoyant hooks and solid musicianship. The songwriting is interesting and entertaining, keeping the retro vibe fresh as well. This SoCal native knows how to do it the way the Nashville crowd used to do it “back in the day.”
TimBennett
Joshua Jacobson – Good Little Thing
Fatmouth Records – FRCD 1001
Joshua Jacobson delves deep into the roots of blues and country to create this wonderful debut. Like a roadmap from Memphis to New Orleans via east Texas, Joshua’s ditties ooze a heady flavor cheap whiskey at smoky juke joints, with a dose of fun. Yes…FUN in the blues, because his lyrics tend to be tongue-in-cheek and whip-smart with even the typical blues themes seeming a bit darkly humorous. If you want to go retro, the path Joshua has blazed is a good one to follow.
JoshuaJacobson
Sam Marine – Big Dark City
The third CD by this L.A.-by -way-of-New York and Florida songwriter packs an incredible amount of intensity into its five tracks. Maybe his music could be called “Powercana”, because it has an Americana vibe that just seethes with furious power – sometimes tempered in subtle doses, other times unleashed with fervent potency. Sounds like something that say Steve Earle and Billlie Joe Armstrong could write together hanging out in Austin. If people have not been awakened to Sam’s presence yet, then this CD is a sonic alarm clock.
SamMarine
Johnny Oskam – In My Shadow
It is actually quite challenging to write original blues these days. Johnny Oskam proves with his second CD that he is adept at rising to that challenge. His blues tends to the hard rock fueled side, but also forays into bits of country, Americana, and funk. While this stew has been cooked before, his recipe features his own unique spices, flavored liberally with incendiary guitar work and powerful vocal calisthenics. Too edgy and intense to even think about ignoring.
JohnnyOksam
Andrea Stray – Into Blue
AS20-02
San Francisco singer-songwriter Andrea Stray has a delectable knack of taking lush, subtly orchestrated musical beds and making them homey and simple, a great conveyance for her thought provoking words. Think Pink Floyd meets Bonnie Raitt musically, with vocal emotions that will grasp your soul as they flow through various moods with intoxicating fervency. This five song EP is a wonderful glimpse at a pool of talent that I assume runs very deep.
AndreaStray

Capsule Reviews by Mark E. Waterbury

Case Garrett – Aurora
Suitcase Records – 001
As the alt/outlaw country rebirth continues, more nuggets of gold keep getting overturned. Case Garrett is a full-on blazing nugget of pure songcrafting talent, fueling a voice that ranges from robust blues-edged to melodic crooning. His vocal emotions help drive the home-spun poignant stories and musically you have a wonderful mosaic ranging from rocking toe-tappers to bittersweet mellow ballads to smoldering retro honky-tonk. Some serious tunes from this Louisiana native.
CaseGarrett
Karen Lovely – Fish Outta Water
A lot of gritty music has come out of the Pacific Northwest and Karen Lovely exemplifies that with her latest release. Gritty, gutsy, smoking like the engine of an overused trawler, Karen unleashes her take on the blues, making even the mellower songs powerful. Backed by excellent musicians, her thought-provoking stories will drive straight into your soul with her fervent vocal work.
KarenLovely
John Pagano Band – One More Round
Midnight Circus Records – MCP 1003
Jeff Healey, Walter Trout, Johnny Winter, and a number of others knew what blues rock was all about. Just listen to “99 Problems” by the John Pagano Band and you cannot argue that they know what it is about. Then listen to the rest of this CD and strap in. “Power trio” seems to fall sonically short of describing these guys as they unleash a stew of rock, blues, funk, and R&B that burns hotter than a supernova. I know, lots of hyperbole here, but check out this CD and you will see I am in no way exaggerating.
JohnPagampBand

John Lafayette Ramey – Exposition Lines

John Lafayette Ramey – Exposition Lines
L.A.’s John Lafayette Ramey shows further depth to his songwriting capabilities on his third solo release. You can feel this just in the first two songs; the hard-charging, edgy roots rocker “Cheap Rent (Move On)” and the touching ballad “Guadalupe” which displays not only his lyrical prowess, but his stunning emotive vocal control. The depth of his songwriting well runs deep throughout the ten tracks with wafts of Brit-pop, Americana, blues and other stylings weaving their way into the overall mosaic. From the haunting groove of “Amelia” to the catchy pop lilt of “Jenny,” John more than proves that he is unafraid to weave any of his varied influences into his musical creations. The result is both comforting and ear opening. – MW
https://johnlafayetteramey.com

JohnLafayetteRamey